ants on a tree (recipe from “hungry monkey”)

For my newly-minted book club, I had the ambitious idea that not only would I read a food-related book a month, I would also try to post a recipe or two from said book.  June’ s book was Hungry Monkey by Matthew Amster-Burton; go here to see the book review and discussion.  (I actually made the dish a couple weeks ago, but time has a habit of slipping away from me these days, hence the delay in posting.)

Ants on a Tree plated 1

It wasn’t hard to choose a recipe out of this book- I went with Ants on a Tree (not to be confused with Ants on a Log, an entirely different animal) because the author constantly refers to it as his family’s favorite dish, and it’s the one thing his daughter has been willing to eat even through her pickiest phases of toddlerhood.  It’s a Szechuan (or Szichuan, depending on your fancy) noodle dish consisting of seasoned ground pork (the “ants”) and bean thread noodles (the “tree”), and it would give me an excuse to use some of those Szechuan peppercorns I bought a while back at Penzey’s.

noodles in bowlThe nice thing about this recipe, and one reason I imagine it’s become a favorite at the author’s dinner table, is that it’s pretty easy to throw together.  I’m sure after making it a few times and having the seasonings memorized, you could whip it together in a matter of 30 minutes or less.  I love highly-seasoned food, so I did enjoy this dish; my only difference of opinion is that I found it a little too “decadent” (see my note below re: oil) to want to consume it on a regular basis.  Also, I wouldn’t consider this a one-dish meal since it’s just meat and carbs with no veg, so I made a batch of my Chinese-style kale to eat alongside the noodles. We had leftovers, which I would venture to say tasted even better in my lunch the next day.

Making this dish led me to ponder having my own hungry monkey someday, and wondering what his or her unwaveringly favorite food would be.  Until then, I’ll just have to live vicariously through the Amster-Burtons, and raise a forkful of noodles as a salute to Iris and her international palate.

Ants on a Tree (recipe from Hungry Monkey, with a couple tiny tweaks as noted) printer-friendly version

pork in wok8 oz. ground pork
2 tbs soy sauce
1 tbs sugar
1 tbs hot bean paste (sometimes sold as spicy bean paste, or hot bean sauce)
1 tsp cornstarch
6-8 oz cellophane (bean thread) noodles
1-2 tbs peanut or other neutral oil (see notes)
2 scallions, white & light green parts only, thinly sliced (the darker tops can be sliced and used as a garnish)
1 red jalapeño or Fresno chili, seeded and minced
1/4 cup chicken stock (canned or from concentrated bouillon is fine)
1 tbs dark (mushroom) soy sauce
1/4 tsp ground Szechuan peppercorns (see notes)

Notes: You may try to see if you can get away with using less than the 2 tbs oil called for in the original recipe, as I found the end result to be a little on the greasy side (perhaps the pork I used had a higher fat content than what the author normally uses).  Also, the Szechuan peppercorns are listed as “optional”, but if I was of a mind to leave them out, I’d just make a different dish instead; in fact, I would even suggest upping the amount to 1/2 tsp if you’re feeling gutsy.

Directions:  Put some water on to boil.  Meanwhile, combine regular soy sauce and cornstarch in a medium-sized bowl to dissolve the cornstarch.  Add the sugar, hot bean paste and pork, stirring thoroughly to combine.  Refrigerate for 20 minutes.

Place the noodles in a large bowl and when your water comes to a boil, pour over the noodles to cover.  Soak for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, then drain in a colander.

Heat oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet or wok over medium-high heat.  Add the scallions and jalapeño and cook 30 seconds, stirring frequently.  Add the pork and stir-fry until no longer pink, breaking up any chunks, about 3 minutes. (You really want to break up the pork as small as possible, or the meat will all sit at the bottom of the dish, negating the whole “ants on a tree” thing.)

Add the noodles, chicken stock, dark soy sauce and Szechaun pepper.  Cook, tossing the noodles with tongs or two wooden spoons, until the sauce is absorbed and the pork is well distributed throughout the noodles.  Transfer to a large platter and serve immediately, garnishing with a few chopped scallions if desired.

 

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10 responses to “ants on a tree (recipe from “hungry monkey”)

  1. This is definitely going to be my next cooking adventure! I remember the mushroom soy sauce, but I can’t remember what hot bean paste/sauce you decided on that day. I’ll have to look at it the next time I’m over.

    It looks delish, for sure!

    • K8- you can borrow some of both, if you want. After all that fretting about whether I was buying the right sauce, I discovered a jar of “Szechuan sauce” in my fridge, and guess what? The ingredients were the same as the sauce I bought! I guess it must go by about 10 different names, but it’s basically just fermented soybeans with some chilis mixed in.

  2. i made this once a few years ago and loved it! thanks for reminding me about it 🙂

  3. It looks so delicious! You’re right, the recipe does seem like it needs some veggies for us “adults”! I understand what he was thinking though, kids would pick them out!

  4. I feel a compulsion to buy Szechuan pepper. I saw a Hermé recipe for truffes made with a Szechuan pepper ganache only yesterday. I shall interpret this as a sign. (…where is my credit card dammit…)

    • Mmm, sounds intriguing! I’ve tried chocolate and cayenne, but never with Szechuan pepper. But since Szechuan peppercorns are technically from citrus, and I love chocolate and citrus, I imagine it would be good. (Et d’ailleurs, est-ce qu’Hermé se tromperait? Je pense que non…)

  5. Noelle, this looks lovely. I wish I had time for the book club – I’d definitely enjoy it, although I’ve just joined a local culinary book club at Motte and Bailey Booksellers in A2.

    • Jen- I heard about that book club, wish it was closer so I could join in! One day, perhaps our book choices will cross paths and you can comment on one of our selections.

  6. Looks so delicious!!!

  7. I made this tonight! Had loved it for a long while in restaurants, and it was yummy and easy. Thanks!

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